Miss Ginsu: About/Bio

 

Get thee to The Donut Plant

tres leches donut

Hola, todos y feliz Cinco de Mayo!

Should you happen to be in New York City today, I highly recommend you stop by The Donut Plant. And I'm not even a "donut person," per se. That said, I am a Donut Plant person.

Always in touch with the tiny details of seasonal change, the sandwich board outside The Donut Plant is my reliable source for what's timely. In the autumn, the specials mature from apple donuts to pumpkin donuts to cranberry donuts to chestnut donuts. In the spring, the sign bounds from ginger-chai donuts to Meyer lemon donuts to the first berry donuts of the new season. And, big bonus: the round-faced fellow who mans the counter is boundlessly friendly.

Today, the sandwich board goes Mexican-style churros and a tres leches donut that's crisp on the outside and lightly sweet on the inside with silky pockets of creamy vanilla pudding. It's heaven alongside a café con leche.

How do they put tres leches inside donuts that have holes? I don't know. They're magic, those Donut Plant people. I don't attempt to replicate their sweet sorcery. I just eat it.

4 spoons

The Donut Plant
379 Grand Street (near Essex)
Manhattan, NY
212.505.3700

Labels: , , , , ,

5.05.2007

2 Comments:

Anonymous Doug said...

check out http://theblognut.net for some awesome donut philosophizing - including the mystery of doughnut plants cream filling

5/06/2007  
Blogger MissGinsu said...

You're right. A very cool site. Almost makes me wish I was a donut person. Almost.

5/06/2007  

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home

Previously: Food Quote Friday: Bill Buford » Previously: Forget Foodies. Unleash the GastroGnomes! » Previously: Handy Stuff: Coffee Concentrate » Previously: Food Quote Friday: Thomas Wolfe » Previously: Got Gloves? » Previously: Food Quote Friday: Chekhov » Previously: A little social chit-chat, etc. » Previously: Food Quote Friday: Sydney Smith » Previously: Tell me again why I'm here. » Previously: Food Quote Friday: François Rabelais »